Until Help Arrives

There are many steps you can take as a responsible homeowner when flooding occurs in your home, whether from an overflowing toilet or a failed sump pump. First of all, keep it safe. Do not do anything that can cause physical harm to yourself or your family, which can mean working in areas with electricity that have water damage issues. Pick things up. When water intrudes, picking up smaller items and placing them out of harm’s way is important. For objects you value, normally smaller items, and can get to without danger to yourself, start wiping them off and getting them dry. Although your water damage pro will handle the final cleaning and restoring of valuable objects, you can do much to help the process.
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Leaks Happen – Be Ready!

You know the normal sounds your home makes.

The air conditioner kicking on as the dog days of summer begin. The heating system starting up on a cold, winter evening. The creak of a loose floorboard as someone rises early in the morning.

What you don’t normally hear — and you do not want to hear — are the sounds of spraying water from a broken pipe or hose, or a malfunctioning hot water tank or water filter system. Even worse is when this happens when you are nowater-leakst home and upon arrival you wade through inches of water on the floor, or duck from the dripping water from an upstairs leak.

When water damage occurs (and statistics say water damage claims are among the highest with
insurance companies) you need to act quickly. The #1 concern is to think “safety first.” Before entering into any areas of the home that are damage from flood waters, be sure that the power is turned off. Nothing is worth getting an electrical shock!

Next, find the water turn-off valve and stop the flooding. Many homeowners aren’t sure where the water turn-off valve is located. Now is the time to figure that out, and even put a tag on it so it is easy to find, especially in the dark or in the beam of a flashlight. Don’t delay… find that valve and mark it!

It’s always best to be prepared. Contact your water damage restoration contractor and get the info you need to be safe… just in case.

It’s Not ‘Just the Carpet’

Many water damage pros have been called by good people just like you who need help “just sucking up the water from the carpet.”

This can be water from an overflowing sink, toilet, maybe a washing machine that got a little ambitious during the spin cycle… or it could be from something more serious, like a broken water pipe or roof damage from a storm.

No matter what, some homeowners only see and think about the squishy carpet and don’t know about all those other areas in the home where water has affected it.

That kind of thinking can get you into a lot of trouble. Continue reading “It’s Not ‘Just the Carpet’”

3 Ways to Avoid Water Damage

What is a water damage? It’s anything that happens in your home that causes problems for you and your family.home-page2

It can be a simple over-flowing of a sink onto the kitchen floor. Or perhaps a toilet didn’t flush properly and it sloshed out a bit onto the bathroom floor. Then again it can be a little more serious such as from a broken pipe that spewed water everywhere in the basement when it was time for spring watering of the flowers.

No matter what, a water damage in your home is bad news. Even the tiniest bit of water can cause all kinds of problems, from the worse (mold damage) to the least (pesky odors).

There are three things you can do to help prevent water damage in your home: Continue reading “3 Ways to Avoid Water Damage”

Hidden Leaks

When a pipe breaks, you know it. Water spewing everywhere, making all kinds of noise and a huge mess that leads to all kinds of expensive damage.

When a pipe leaks, that’s a different story as you may not discover it until expensive damage occurs.

Under every sink in your home, you have two types of pipes: Supply and drain. Either type can leak and cause all kinds of damage, often at a slow but steady rate, and not only to the floor directly under the pipes. Water can run down into the sub-floor, into floor cavities and even into rooms underneath. Continue reading “Hidden Leaks”